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Vietnam War


  • Barry Zorthian's War: The Pentagon and the Press in Vietnam

    by Ron Steinman

    A 1970 speech by Barry Zorthian, the Pentagon's chief public information officer in Vietnam, shows a thoughtful approach to balancing the rights of journalists with the need of the military to control information. That approach is missing in the era of "fake news" and open hostility by the administration for the press.


  • Spike Lee’s Da 5 Bloods: How Bad is It?

    by Jerry Lembcke

    A historian of public perceptions of the Vietnam War (who served as a military chaplain there) warns that Spike Lee's latest film traffics in stereotypes of both American veterans and the Vietnamese people while reinforcing right-wing narratives about the war.



  • Flight Status

    by Sarah Rose

    During the Vietnam War, the women who served on special Pan Am flights flew into a war zone to transport soldiers. Why has their role been forgotten?



  • How 13 Seconds Changed Kent State University Forever

    As the 50th anniversary of the Kent State killings passed this week, the University had been advancing along a difficult path to acknowledge the events and introduce new students to the campus's tragic history.

  • The Truth about the Five O’ Clock Follies

    by Ron Steinman

    Ron Steinman covered the notorious "Five O'Clock Follies" press conferences held by American military leadership in Saigon, and warns against comparing them to the Trump administration's daily Coronavirus briefings. 


  • “Patriotic” Veterans Only, Please

    by Gregory A. Daddis

    While perhaps an indication of our current toxic political environment, the attacks on “unpatriotic” veterans like U.S. Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman actually have a long and checkered history in post-World War II America.