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teaching history



  • 1619, Revisited

    by Nicholas Guyatt

    Argument isn’t an obstacle to the work of historians; it is the work of historians. Public interest in 1619 has suggested something truly profound: that Americans have the capacity to think differently about their history. 



  • On Recent Criticism of The 1619 Project

    by Jake Silverstein

    Critics of the 1619 Project have identified changes and edits to the text of Nikole Hannah-Jones's article, which they claim were made surreptitiously to conceal errors. Editor Jake Silverstein addresses those criticisms. 



  • The Right's War on Universities

    by Ruth Ben-Ghiat

    "From the fascist years in Europe, nearly a century ago, to our own times, right-wing leaders have accused universities of being incubators of left-wing ideologies and sought to mold them in the image of their own propaganda, policy, and policing aims."



  • Ethnic Studies Can't Make Up for Whitewashed History in Classrooms

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    "American history is ethnic studies. You simply can’t understand the United States without addressing its component races, ethnicities and religions. Sadly, the recent drive for ethnic studies demonstrates just how far we are from that ideal."



  • How the 1619 Project took over 2020

    Interviewing project lead Nikole Hannah-Jones and numerous supporters and detractors, Sarah Ellison explores why the 1619 project, more than a year after its publication, is still making people argue about history.



  • #WEWANTMOREHISTORY

    by Greg Downs, Hilary N. Green, Scott Hancock, and Kate Masur

    At historic sites across the United States on September 26, dozens of participating historians presented evidence to disrupt, correct, or fill out the oversimplified and problematic messages too often communicated by the nation’s memorial landscape.



  • The Root of American Power

    by Megan Beyer

    "October is National Arts and Humanities Month. Observing what happens in America when we fail to protect them, invest in them, and recognize their value, is the best case that could ever be made for the Arts and Humanities."



  • How We Teach US History

    Historian Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Massachusetts History Teacher of the Year N'Dia Riegler, and Director of Literacy and Humanities for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education discuss how to teach the difficult and conflict-ridden aspects of the national past. 



  • “Shocking Levels of Ignorance”? A Closer Look at the Survey of Millennials' Holocaust Awareness

    A recent survey claimed to show widespread ignorance about the Holocaust among young American adults, but its methods may not support its most sensational conclusions. Regardless, other surveys show that Americans value learning about the history of the Holocaust. Educators should capitalize by encouraging students to go beyond memorizing facts to understanding the processes of ethnic vilification, political violence and genocide.



  • Trump is Afraid of Honest History

    by James Grossman

    Trump's proposal for a "1776 Commission" suggests that history teachers should be cheerleaders, reducing the nation’s complex past to a simplistic and inaccurate narrative of unique virtue and perpetual progress.



  • OAH Statement on White House Conference on American History

    "The history we teach must investigate the core conflict between a nation founded on radical notions of liberty, freedom, and equality, and a nation built on slavery, exploitation, and exclusion." 



  • Standing up for Professors

    Washington and Lee University offered a strong defense of its faculty when they were vilified in right-wing media and received threats and online abuse.