;

Republican Party



  • The Never Trumpers Have Already Won

    by Samuel Moyn

    Never Trump's historic role turns out to be not among Republicans so far, but within a Democratic Party whose members have chosen to convert enemies into friends, setting up a guardrail against the capture of their party by the left.



  • The Impact of White Evangelicals on U.S. Politics (Audio)

    Historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez argues in "Jesus and John Wayne" that contemporary Evangelical political views are a product of the group's embrace of patriarchal authority and power, a situation that will not end when Trump leaves office. 


  • Who Opened the Door to Trumpism? David Frum's "Trumpocalypse" Reviewed

    by David O'Connor

    Through his long analysis of Trump’s follies, Frum never develops his contention that twenty-first-century conservatism helped open the door for Trump. Without a full accounting, his political mea culpa is hollow and fails to offer guidance on how to avoid mistakes in the future.



  • The Western Origins of the “Southern Strategy”

    by Bruce Bartlett

    The growing importance of racially conservative white Republicans in the western states after World War II helped present southern whites with a viable alternative to the Democratic Party. 



  • The Republican Choice: How a Party Spent Decades Making Itself White

    Talk of “election integrity” by the Grand Old Party is inextricably intertwined with its modern history of pandering to racist elements of American life; any attempt to disentangle these stories and tell them separately is disingenuous, even if it angers partisans.



  • Why Can’t Republicans Elect Women?

    The Republican Party has not matched the gains made by Democrats in seating women in Congress since the "Year of the Woman" in 1992. 



  • Did Lincoln Take his Cues From Congress?

    Historian Allen C. Guelzo reviews Fergus Bordewich's new book "Congress at War: How Republican Reformers Fought the Civil War, Defied Lincoln, Ended Slavery, and Remade America," which argues that the 37th and 38th Congresses had a bigger role in the abolition of slavery than the 16th president.