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19th Amendment


  • Suffragists' Work Didn't End in 1920

    by Mary Henold

    Women of color and their allies truly won the right to vote for all American women not in 1920, but in 1965, with the passage of the Voting Rights Act. 



  • Women, Voting, and the Nineteenth Amendment: A JAH Suffrage Reader

    To mark the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, and to encourage critical assessment of the broader histories of suffrage and suffrage restriction in the United States, the Journal of American History has assembled “Women, Voting, and the Nineteenth Amendment: A JAH Suffrage Reader.”



  • Protest Delivered the Nineteenth Amendment

    The amendment, ratified a century ago, is often described as having “given” women the right to vote. It wasn’t a gift; it was a hard-won victory achieved after more than seventy years of suffragist agitation.



  • 19 Facts About the 19th Amendment on its 100th Anniversary

    The suffrage movement that led to the 19th Amendment was intertwined with many other social reform movements of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but the broad demands of egalitarian reforms activists wanted remain unfulfilled. 



  • When the Suffrage Movement Sold Out to White Supremacy

    by Brent Staples

    Historians like Glenda Gilmore, Martha Jones, Nell Irvin Painter and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn have recently revised the whitewashed depiction of the women’s rights campaign by rescuing black suffragists from anonymity.