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Roundup

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Calhoun-Fall

    by Peter H. Wood

    "When word spread that the Charleston City Council had voted unanimously to remove the domineering figure from his skyscraping column, I thought of a comment Walt Whitman recorded at the end of the Civil War. After Confederate forces had surrendered at Appomattox Court House, the poet overheard a Union soldier observe that the true monuments to Calhoun were the wasted farms and gaunt chimneys scattered over the South."



  • St. Louis’s Statue of Pius XII: A Double-Standard

    by Eunice G. Pollack

    If Yale has renamed a residential college named for John C. Calhoun and Princeton will cease to name its public policy school after Woodrow Wilson, the Jesuit St. Louis University should consider evidence of Pope Pius XII's actions in the face of the Holocaust and remove his statue from campus. 



  • When France Extorted Haiti – the Greatest Heist in History

    by Marlene Daut

    Because the indemnity Haiti paid to France is the first and only time a formerly enslaved people were forced to compensate those who had once enslaved them, Haiti should be at the center of the global movement for reparations.



  • The Surprising Cross-Racial Saga of Modern Wealth Inequality

    by Adolph Reed Jr.

    A political scientist argues that the black-white wealth gap is mostly a product of four decades of income gains accruing to the highest earners; accordingly a broad economic justice program is the best way to close the wealth gap. 



  • What Defunding the Police can Mean for U.S. Foreign Policy

    by Stuart Schrader

    To start this process will require looking inward, but it will be impossible without looking outward as well — by rethinking the U.S. role in the world, shrinking the Department of Defense’s massive footprint, and redirecting its resources and legitimacy toward more peaceful streets.



  • Should the Freedmen’s Memorial Stay or Go?

    by Kevin M. Levin

    In considering what to do about the emancipation memorial, academic observers would do well to consider the gap between their understanding of a statue's public impact and the way that black residents experience it. 



  • The Rap Against Christopher Columbus Statues Overlooks Their Origins

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    The great achievement of the 20th-century United States was the integration of formerly excluded ethnics -- Italians, Irish, Jews, and others -- into full citizenship and equality. And the great tragedy was our failure to do the same for nonwhites, especially African Americans and Native Americans.



  • Building The Chicago Police State: A Review Of Occupied Territory

    by Davarian L. Baldwin

    "With scrupulous archival detail and sharp analytic focus, Occupied Territory shows how Chicago’s “powerful carceral machinery,” which present-day Black communities condemns for its under-protection and over-policing, was built in the early twentieth century." 



  • Abolition or Bust: Liberal Police Reform as an Engine of Carceral Violence

    by Charlotte Rosen

    Recent work by scholars including Naomi Murakawa, Jodi Melamed, Elizabeth Hinton, Marisol LeBrón, Simon Balto, Max Felker-Kantor and Alex Vitale show that liberal reforms to policing fail to solve serious problems and reinforce the power and reach of police departments to the detriment of the disadvantaged.