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Historians in the News

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • For Many, an Afro isn’t Just a Hairstyle

    Journalist Ernie Suggs reflects on how hairstyles reflected his own family's history, with backing from historians Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham and Noliwe Rooks. 



  • The Broken System: What Comes After Meritocracy?

    by Elizabeth Anderson

    Philosopher Elizabeth Anderson reviews Michael Sandel's critique of meritocracy, a book that locates an explanation for the Trumpian moment in the rise of competitive individualism in the platforms of both major parties. 



  • How George Washington Didn’t Lead

    Historians Lindsay Chervinsky, Noemie Emery, David Head and Craig Bruce Smith offer reflections in a virtual forum on the first president's leadership.



  • After the Riot, What’s the Future of Art in the Capitol?

    Art Historian Sarah Lewis suggests that damage to the artworks in the Capitol during the rioting presents an opportunity to rethink what subjects are included in a collection that signals inclusion in the national narrative. 



  • The Future Of Confederate Monuments

    by Kim O'Connell

    “The Park Service needs to ask, ‘Who’s coming to your site and who’s not coming to your site?’” says Denise Meringolo, a professor of public history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. “Those monuments are a barrier to significant portions of the audience, for whom they are not simply inaccurate or annoying. They are traumatizing.”



  • Black Women Have Written History for over a Century

    Pero Gaglo Dagbovie examines the work of Black women scholar-activists like Anna Julia Cooper whose work integrated the writing of African American history with political organizing, despite exclusion from the academy.



  • The Current Republic of Suffering

    by Murray Browne

    Drew Gilpin Faust's "This Republic of Suffering" inspires reflection on how the collective experiences of COVID and the loss of a half million Americans may shape the society that emerges. 



  • The Arch of Injustice

    Historian Steven Hahn reviews Walter Johnson's "The Broken Heart of America," finding that Johnson makes a compelling case that St. Louis is the archetypal American city but is less effective at showing concepts like white supremacy and racial capitalism as dynamic historical processes. 



  • The Prices on Your Monopoly Board Hold a Dark Secret

    The value hierarchy of properties on the Monopoly game board reflect the history of Atlantic City; the game was created as the Great Migration brought African Americans north to New Jersey and spurred northern cities and their white residents to create and defend residential segregation.