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Books


  • The SS Officer's Armchair

    by Daniel Lee

    The discovery of a trove of documents in an old armchair led the author on a five-year search for information about a previously anonymous Nazi, whose history intersected with the author's family in surprising ways.


  • "Fiction Makes a Better Job of The Truth"? Telling the Erased Story of Lucia Joyce

    by Annabel Abbs

    A historical novel exposes the complex relationship between historians and sources: "Because Lucia’s own voice had been effectively smothered, most ‘facts’ came from those later responsible for incarcerating her in a series of mental asylums and hospitals. Few sources are genuinely independent, memory is notoriously fickle, and all facts are open to interpretation."


  • The Other Booths

    by David O. Stewart

    The notoriety of the Lincoln assassination has obscured the other Booths in history, but some were as well known as John Wilkes--or even better, at least until he pulled the trigger in the president’s box at Ford’s Theater, 155 years ago this week. 


  • Why Holocaust Fiction?

    by Bernice Lerner

    Had they had a choice, I believe Hitler’s victims would have wanted nothing about the mortal crimes against them falsified. 


  • A Price to Be Paid

    by Col. Arthur Shaw (Ret.) and Robert L. Wise

    None of us had any idea how terrible the cost would be before we finished taking Okinawa. The casual observer might have concluded that the landing was so easy, war must be a walk in the park.


  • Kamikazes at the Battle of Okinawa

    by Joseph Wheelan

    On May 6, 1945, a twin-engine kamikaze plane’s bomb exploded beside the destroyer Luce, part of the radar picket ship screen surrounding Okinawa, and ripped her starboard side “like a sardine can.”